Hello! I’m not sure how you found me, but I’m glad that you did.
To sum up, I design websites that look great on phones, tablets, and computers, and that are very easy to maintain. I prefer WordPress as a CMS (content management system) and am also fluent in HTML, CSS, and JavaScript. I like to use color and imagery to help business owners and artists convey their message to visitors, existing and potential. I am also well-versed in e-commerce websites through the use of WooCommerce/Paypal.
I help people use social media and content to their advantage. I can instruct nearly anyone on best practices for web maintenance, social media, hashtags, and SEO.
I am also a photographer who specializes in portraits and headshots, food/cocktail photography, interiors and exteriors for real estate, still life photography, and in photo retouching using Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Lightroom. Have passport, will travel!
On the personal side, I am a California native, born in the early 80’s, and a lover of 90’s music. I am most creative when the sun goes down and into the early morning hours. I love sunset naps in my backyard hammock, traveling abroad, snuggling my three rat terrier pups, and sipping a glass of wine in the evening. I know all of the words to “2 of Amerikaz Most Wanted” by Tupac and Snoop Dogg. “Two Princes” by Spin Doctors is also a fav. The first car I ever bought for myself was a black 1998 Ford Mustang GT with black leather interior, and I miss it like the dickens. I’d consider myself adventurous, but not necessarily brave. I am a fan of the Los Angeles Lakers and the San Francisco Giants, even when they suck. I enjoy being on the beach, but I’ve only been in the ocean twice three times (once on a snorkeling dive in Catalina when I was 10 years old; once in Malibu; most recently in a hot spring in the Aegean Sea off of Santorini, Greece). I also love sushi and cheesecake.
My core values are honesty, compassion, and forgiveness. I think it’s more important to listen than it is to speak. When it comes to ideas: give me an inch, I will give you a mile. I prefer to arrive early, and I believe that the entire world is a glorious opportunity to learn.
If you’re down, I would LOVE to work with you! Let’s talk about your ideas.
Los Angeles Web Designer | Photographer Los Angeles | Mykonos, Greece
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Mykonos, Greece

After waking up at about 5 AM the day after landing, following a 17-hour flight and one quick night in Athens, we sailed two hours to the old port in Mykonos with no clue as to what the hell we were doing or how we would get to where we were going without spending a fortune. We were so blessed to have at least minimal battery life on our phones and to have stumbled upon a cafe with WiFi and a waiter who cared enough to be kind and honest with us. He told us, specifically, that in the future we should fly to the islands from Athens rather than take the hydrofoil, because it’s faster and, somehow, cheaper. Noted, new friend.

If we hadn’t had all of our suitcases with us, I know that we would have done a lot more exploring near the port that morning. Instead, brother and I ended up walking, suitcases in hand, a little less than 10 minutes along a very narrow coastal road to a taxi stop. We paid 13 EU to get to our hotel and couldn’t believe how incredible it was at first glance; how kind the staff was to us from the start. We drove up and a staff member immediately ran out to help grab our bags before we had even gotten out of the taxi!

Checking in was so simple. Put your passport down, sign the form, and you’re in! The bags are already in your room before you can blink. They also use a paper map (that you can take with you) to walk you through the sites on the island, how to get to them, how long it will take you, and other things like the local stores and transportation, including buses.

This was truly the beginning of our adventure.

The rooms are spectacular and the views are to die for from nearly every room in this hotel. They have a HUGE lobby, that I venture to guess rarely gets used. The saltwater pool and restaurant are exquisite.

We walked down to the beach that the hotel informed us wasn’t so windy; we grabbed a bunch of water and a couple of other items at a local market; we did some hiking and took some photographs while admiring the local homes.

Upon returning back to the hotel, we decided to hop in the pool. It was cold, I’ll grant you that. But the saltwater is so good for the skin, and everyone knows that you have to just jump in and warm it up by swimming around, so I did a couple of laps and waded around before hopping out and relaxing on the beach chairs. Will got out shortly after me. We enjoyed a nice, quiet dinner at our hotel’s restaurant where we shared a delicious mushroom/zucchini appetizer and risotto. We retired early because we were absolutely exhausted.

The most eventful thing we did in Mykonos was to take the bus down to “Sunset Beach” and explore. We did wait quite a while for the bus but discovered that their public transportation is nothing at all like ours here in the states. Their “public transportation” buses are like nicer Greyhound buses: plush, comfy, and brand spanking new. There are vendors and restaurants and sites all up and down the coast, many of which are totally worth stopping for. Our favorites were an Olivewood store, an art gallery, and a little shop on the beach near the windmills. Speaking of, we stopped at the famous windmills for photographs, as you do. A bit of a frustrating experience, since almost everyone else has the same idea, but all-in-all very rewarding. We spent a lot of money on gifts and souvenirs (mostly art), had a small meal, and watched the sunset — as instructed by our hotel — with cameras ready. There were a lot of other people out there with cameras ready, too, but everyone was very kind and accommodating of one another. After our long and wonderful day, we hailed a cab for 10 EU and were back in our hotel before 10 PM.

At “Sunset Beach” there are vendors and restaurants and sites all up and down the coast, many of which are totally worth stopping for. Our favorites were an Olivewood store, an art gallery, and a tiny little shop on the beach near the windmills. Speaking of, we stopped at the famous windmills for photographs, as you do. A bit of a frustrating experience, since almost everyone else has the same idea, but all-in-all very rewarding. We perched on top of some old ruins for about 30 minutes waiting for the crowds to dissipate before I grew tired of waiting and we decided to walk around the windmills themselves.

We spent a lot of money on gifts and souvenirs (mostly art), had a small meal, and watched the sunset — as instructed by our hotel — with cameras ready. There were a lot of other people out there with cameras ready, too, but everyone was very kind and accommodating of one another. After our long and wonderful day, we hailed a cab for 10 EU and were back in our hotel before 10 PM.  Upon returning, I did some photography of the property on a timer with a tripod, Will enjoyed a Cuban cigar out on the balcony, and we watched Trump pull out of the Iran deal on the BBC (our favorite channel on this trip) before we retired for the evening.

On the strip, we spent a lot of money on gifts and souvenirs (mostly art), had a small meal, and watched the sunset — as instructed by our hotel — with cameras ready. There were a lot of other people out there with cameras ready, too, but everyone was very kind and accommodating of one another. After our long and wonderful day, we hailed a cab for 10 EU and were back in our hotel before 10 PM.  Upon returning, I did some photography of the property on a timer with a tripod, Will enjoyed a Cuban cigar out on the balcony, and we watched Trump pull out of the Iran deal on the BBC (our favorite channel on this trip) before we retired for the evening.

After our long and wonderful day, we hailed a cab for 10 EU and were back in our hotel before 10 PM. We enjoyed a nice, quiet dinner at our hotel’s restaurant where we shared a delicious mushroom/zucchini appetizer and risotto. After dinner, Will Facetimed with his wife, I did some photography of the property on a timer with a tripod, Will then enjoyed a Cuban cigar out on the balcony, and we watched Trump pull out of the Iran deal on the BBC (our favorite channel on this trip) before we retired for the evening.

There wasn’t much left to do in Mykonos but have breakfast and check out of our hotel before being rushed to the docks for our second hydrofoil. And off to Santorini we went!

*We definitely want to thank Yiannaki and all of their staff for their amazing service, kindness, and friendliness.

Hillary Campbell
hello@hillarycampbell.com

30-something. Aries. Angeleno, California-native. I love puppies, sushi, wine, rollercoasters, and karaoke. Hiking, biking, rollerblading, and general exploration are activities I enjoy. I am a photographer and web designer. Have passport; will travel.

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